Creamware pottery jug commemorating the Peace of Amiens in 1802

The Treaty of Amiens (French: la paix d’Amiens, lit. ’the peace of Amiens’) temporarily ended hostilities between France and the United Kingdom at the end of the War of the Second Coalition. It marked the end of the French Revolutionary Wars; after a short peace it set the stage for the Napoleonic Wars. Britain gave up most of its recent conquests; France was to evacuate Naples and Egypt. Britain retained Ceylon (Sri Lanka) and Trinidad. It was signed in the city of Amiens on 25 March 1802 (4 Germinal X in the French Revolutionary calendar) by Joseph Bonaparte and Marquess Cornwallis as a “Definitive Treaty of Peace”. The consequent peace lasted only one year (18 May 1803) and was the only period of general peace in Europe between 1793 and 1814.

Height: 7 ¼”

Condition: Crack and rim chips restored



£480

US$576